Skating rink – Speed Skating http://speedskating.org/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 16:41:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://speedskating.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Skating rink – Speed Skating http://speedskating.org/ 32 32 Ste. Anne ready to replace the outdoor rink https://speedskating.org/ste-anne-ready-to-replace-the-outdoor-rink/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 10:00:01 +0000 https://speedskating.org/ste-anne-ready-to-replace-the-outdoor-rink/ The Town of Ste Anne receives assistance to pay for a new outdoor rink. Initially, the city received a grant of $ 25,000 from Manitoba 150 which was to be used for the city’s annual summer festival, the Dawson Trail Days. After the event was canceled for two consecutive years due to the pandemic, this […]]]>

The Town of Ste Anne receives assistance to pay for a new outdoor rink.

Initially, the city received a grant of $ 25,000 from Manitoba 150 which was to be used for the city’s annual summer festival, the Dawson Trail Days. After the event was canceled for two consecutive years due to the pandemic, this grant was redirected to another important project.

“Our original outdoor rink was built in the late 1960s, early 1970s, I believe,” explains Sarah Normandeau, Director of Recreational Services. “He looks very abandoned. It’s time to do it again.

She says the city has been talking about this project for some time. The aim was to build the new outdoor ice rink in a more visible location, closer to the Zamboni area.

“We have accessibility issues with where it is now,” says Normandeau. “It’s not easy to access. There are doors, or there is like a chain over there. It is more difficult to achieve. You don’t see it as much, so vandalism is a problem there. “

She adds that the new location, behind the Twice But Nice flea market, will provide greater visibility and, hopefully, reduce the problem of vandalism.

Normandeau expects construction to begin within the next few weeks. She notes that the old outdoor rink will remain in place until the new one is ready for use.

There is still work to be done to complete the planning part of the project as well as finalizing the total cost.


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NIAGARA DISCOVERIES: Henry Thurston, Entertainment Entrepreneur | Lifestyles https://speedskating.org/niagara-discoveries-henry-thurston-entertainment-entrepreneur-lifestyles/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://speedskating.org/niagara-discoveries-henry-thurston-entertainment-entrepreneur-lifestyles/ In the 21st century, it’s hard to imagine that 100 years ago movies were considered a novelty. At the start of the 20th century, several small theaters were opened in Lockport to present this new form of entertainment. One of them was operated by Henry F. Thurston. Before examining this theater, we will examine his […]]]>

In the 21st century, it’s hard to imagine that 100 years ago movies were considered a novelty.

At the start of the 20th century, several small theaters were opened in Lockport to present this new form of entertainment. One of them was operated by Henry F. Thurston. Before examining this theater, we will examine his life before this event.

Thurston was born in Wilson, in 1877, son of Nelson and Augusta Wright Thurston. At various times his family resided in Wilson, Niagara Falls and Lockport, and young Henry attended schools in the latter two towns. His first job was with Fiber Manufacturing Co. on Mill Street (later Indurated Fiber) in Lockport. In 1901, Henry joined forces with John McCarthy to open a candy store at 64 Main Street. A year later, he opened a billiard room at 7 Main Street, which he operated until 1910.

Expanding his business prospects, Thurston took advantage of the new roller skating craze by erecting an ice rink on Walnut Street near Pine Street. He was a world champion skater and famous for skating on one foot. When the pool hall closed, due to the widening of the Erie Canal, Thurston entered the movie business when he opened the Golden Palace Theater at 64 Main Street.

The first exhibition venues were usually located in storefronts where the floors were built sloping and could accommodate 100 to 200 people. A piano provided appropriate music for silent films projected on a screen. The projection booth was at the back of the theater (in front of the building). These cabins were dangerous devices that were small, cramped and lacked adequate ventilation.

By 1911, Thurston had converted the ice rink into a new theater, the Temple at 121 Walnut Street, and established an open-air “auditorium” on the corner of Walnut and Pine to host sporting events. In 1916, this arena was closed and became the Thurston Auditorium.

In the late 1910s and early 1920s, Thurston was a busy man, operating two entertainment venues almost opposite each other. It was around this time that he brought his sons, Raymond and Carl, into the business to help manage the two locations. In 1924, the Auditorium Thurston was replaced by the Rialto Theater. This was a pivotal period for Lockport theaters with several openings in the 1920s, including the Palace in 1925. It was also around this time that Thurston sold his theatrical interests to the Schine theater chain and moved to d other activites.

In 1928, William Thiele opened a bowling alley at 79 Walnut Street. This was acquired by Henry Thurston in 1933 and enlarged to 81 Walnut Street. A newspaper article reported on the “brilliant reopening of the bowling lanes” and described “many pleasant changes and decided improvements … combined to make the reopening of the Thurston bowling lanes in Walnut St. a momentous occasion”. Although Thurston only had the lanes for a few years, they were popular and well advertised in the newspapers. An ad reads: “Are you a bowler? My God, the things bowling will do for you. Exercise makes you strong and happy – it’s a health benefit.

As a businessman and resident of the city, Thurston decided to run for mayor of Lockport in 1933. He could not get the approval of the Republicans, so he changed parties and s’ is presented as a Democrat. According to a newspaper article, he won “with a large majority”. His campaign was based on the promise that he would “abolish the small transplants and illegal practices that have become so entrenched because of long custom” and give the city a “clean, honest and honorable administration.”

Thurston kept his election promises by taking over the town’s water utility. The new mayor has learned that the city uses 6.7 million gallons of water per day, but the water utility can only count 2.7 million gallons. It was discovered that many “friends” of water service workers received free water in their homes and businesses while ordinary citizens were cut off if they missed a payment. Thurston also closed what one newspaper called “vicious” houses; these places have fostered various types of vice by paying the police to look away. And, he proposed to create a city purchasing department where all purchases would be submitted for approval, thereby removing authority from department heads.

Needless to say, many of these measures and proposals have not gone well with some of the municipal office holders, department heads or “superiors”. Thurston served as mayor for two years and lost the 1935 election to his Republican opponent.

In 1938, Thurston began another chapter in his life. He bought the old Whitcomb-Holmes building at 4-6 Lock Street and opened a restaurant. It has been described as having “a spacious banquet hall, bar, grill and cafe” and has been “advertised as one of the most modern and attractive venues in western New York” . As an added convenience it was “fully air conditioned”. The building also included five apartments, one of which Thurston used as his own. The restaurant was short lived, closing in 1942. It later became the Lockport Moose Lodge.

As for her personal life, Thurston married Elizabeth Conniff at St. John’s Catholic Church in 1899. They had seven children, six sons and a daughter. Elizabeth died in 1921 and Thurston married Mary F. Murphy in 1924.

Thurston, a man of many talents, died on December 31, 1947, at the age of 70. He is buried in Saint-Patrick cemetery.

Ann Marie Linnabery is Associate Director of the History Center of Niagara.


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Planet Ice Arena Peterborough: Cambs Ice Skating Arena, a perfect fall day for the family https://speedskating.org/planet-ice-arena-peterborough-cambs-ice-skating-arena-a-perfect-fall-day-for-the-family/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 17:02:14 +0000 https://speedskating.org/planet-ice-arena-peterborough-cambs-ice-skating-arena-a-perfect-fall-day-for-the-family/ Ice skating is a fun day (or evening), a fun place to take the kids, or even a great idea for a first date. Planet Ice is Europe’s number one ice rink chain with 14 locations in the UK, including one right here in Cambridgeshire, so you don’t have to travel too far to get […]]]>

Ice skating is a fun day (or evening), a fun place to take the kids, or even a great idea for a first date.

Planet Ice is Europe’s number one ice rink chain with 14 locations in the UK, including one right here in Cambridgeshire, so you don’t have to travel too far to get on the ice.

Put on your skates

If you’re convinced that you could be the next Torvill… or maybe Dean…? Then put your money where your mouth is and learn the basics of skating on Planet Ice.

He claims to have a “fantastic track record in teaching people to skate,” so no matter how wobbly you are on the ice, there’s a good chance you’ll come away from the lessons sliding like a swan.

Planet Ice runs a Skate Excellence program that places more emphasis on having fun while learning.

And don’t forget to wear gloves because there is a good chance that you will spill a few times and the ice will be cold.

Give a puck

If you’re an ice hockey fan (or maybe just a Mighty Ducks fan), why not try playing Planet Ice?

Sign up for a course and learn the basics of the game in just 3-5 days, including developing skating, puck and stick control skills.

“You cannot be afraid of losing …”

Show off

If your skating lessons are going really, REALLY well … then why not get into SHOW SKATING !?

Show & Skate sessions at Planet Ice focus on the performing arts on ice, skating movements and skills used in shows and will also be the source of skaters for all Planet Ice projects itself into the future.

The website states, “All skaters interested in performance skating and wishing to pursue a career in performance skating should consider registering for the new Show and Skate 2021 sessions. Skaters who wish to participate in the shows will need to register. at the Show. and skating sessions available at the rink “.

So this is your chance to make the big time!

A block of six lessons can be booked from £ 41.

Pizza!

If all that skating makes you hungry, there are also places to have a drink at Planet Ice. It serves Lavazza coffee to warm you up and Papa John’s pizza.

All pizzas are freshly made and there are often specials so keep an eye out for bargains.

Go ghosts!

Planet Ice is home to the Peterborough Phantoms ice hockey team.

Catch their match against MK Lighting on September 12 at 5:30 p.m. Visit iceaccount.co.uk for tickets.

Address: Planet Ice Arena, 1 Mallard Road, Peterborough. Go to planet-ice.co.uk.


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The Day – Galaxy Roller Rink property sold https://speedskating.org/the-day-galaxy-roller-rink-property-sold/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:37:16 +0000 https://speedskating.org/the-day-galaxy-roller-rink-property-sold/ Groton – Tidal River Holdings LLC, whose members include Outer Light Brewing Company owners Matt Ferrucci and Tom Drejer, purchased the Galaxy Roller Rink property at 210 Bridge St. for $ 2,449,500 and the two-family house at 240 Bridge St. for $ 150,000. Ferrucci said they were considering their plans. “We’re not there yet, but […]]]>

Groton – Tidal River Holdings LLC, whose members include Outer Light Brewing Company owners Matt Ferrucci and Tom Drejer, purchased the Galaxy Roller Rink property at 210 Bridge St. for $ 2,449,500 and the two-family house at 240 Bridge St. for $ 150,000.

Ferrucci said they were considering their plans.

“We’re not there yet, but we’ll definitely share all of our news,” Ferrucci said. He said they were “kind of crazy” at their brewery at 266 Bridge Street, and “the original plan was to potentially move the brewery to the rink and expand it that way.”

Ferrucci said the talks predated the COVID-19 pandemic and that he spoke to the owner of the Lou Trefes rink. Ferrucci said things were put on hold during the pandemic and Trefes died last October.

Ferrucci said the building has been neglected and “it’s a mess in there,” so for now, the plan is for Outer Light to stay put. But he thinks the land is a great opportunity for the city.

“We’re open to what the public has to say, maybe apartments, maybe more of the same. We don’t know,” Ferrucci said.

The property at 210 Bridge Street is zoned general commercial.

Ferrucci said a structural engineer and architect came to examine the property. There has been “horrible water damage, and it’s starting to become a cheaper project to build from scratch, than trying to renovate the roof and all that stuff,” he said. .

Advanced improvements work on the site. Asked about the demolition, Ferrucci said he was trying to figure out how to move forward.

Galaxy Roller Rink, which was built in 1955 and named Melody Skating Rink at the time, closed in February 2018; Matt Longino owned the business and leased the building. At the time, Trefes said he planned to bring in someone else to run an ice rink, but contractors said the roof was beyond repair.

Shortly afterwards, city building official Carlton Smith informed that the structure was unsafe, due to water leaking through the exterior of the roof and a section of suspended ceiling falling. on the skating rink.

The sale of the Galaxy Roller Rink property from Trefes & Trefes General Partnership to Tidal River Holdings LLC was recorded in the city’s land registers on August 12, 2021.

e.moser@theday.com


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A helping hand: temporary interventions can be long-term investments in neighborhoods (CAB 2021) https://speedskating.org/a-helping-hand-temporary-interventions-can-be-long-term-investments-in-neighborhoods-cab-2021/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 11:20:33 +0000 https://speedskating.org/a-helping-hand-temporary-interventions-can-be-long-term-investments-in-neighborhoods-cab-2021/ Opening of the 75th Street promenade. Courtesy Site Design Group The neighborhood venues for this edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennale are set on wasteland in the city, leaving me to wonder about the long-term impact of these installations on neighborhoods. Realizing that these are ephemeral installations, meant to enliven, inspire and bring about change, […]]]>

Opening of the 75th Street promenade. Courtesy Site Design Group

The neighborhood venues for this edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennale are set on wasteland in the city, leaving me to wonder about the long-term impact of these installations on neighborhoods. Realizing that these are ephemeral installations, meant to enliven, inspire and bring about change, are they making a difference in many disinvested neighborhoods in Chicago, especially on the south and west sides of the city?

Following on from the city’s south / west investment programs that Mayor Lightfoot’s Planning Commissioner Maurice Cox and Transport Commissioner Gia Biagi have launched, these facilities are giving a dynamic boost – perhaps a vaccine – the rust pandemic which has infected these neighborhoods for decades.

When you look at the history of these neighborhoods, from Bronzeville to Roseland, from West Garfield Park to Austin, there is a vibrant and rich history of prosperity and growth, of wealth and commerce that has vanished since the white flight of years. 1960. What remains are blocks and blocks of vacant lots of rubble, buildings doomed to collapse, and streets with weeds growing through cracks into the sun.

Over the years, there have been interventions in the South and West neighborhoods of Chicago: Amanda Williams’ painting “Color (ed) Theory” houses vivid colors for the 2015 Chicago Biennale; Theaster Gates is redeveloping his own Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood, one building at a time; Ghian Foreman takes over the Overton School and the surrounding grounds in Bronzeville and grows sunflowers as if they were a field of sunshine. Let us not forget Bernard Loyd creating Boxville Marketplace or Emmanuel Pratt and his Sweet Water Foundation tearing up sections of vacant plots and abandoned buildings and transforming them into community goods. These are examples of people taking back their ruined land in their own neighborhoods and making a long-term investment in their future.

Opening of the 75th Street promenade. Courtesy Site Design Group

Investment is what is needed most. The south and west sides certainly have more vacant lots and condemned buildings than the north side of Chicago. There are more crimes and hardships. So when real estate developers and investors need their return on investment in seven years or less, they will certainly go the easy way, with more expensive land where it can be easily developed and transformed. Banks like it too: less risk. The vacancies on the south and west sides will require longer term investments to reach their potential. Fifteen years minimum, thirty years more likely. But find me a developer or a bank that is willing to go this route, and I will find you a much higher interest rate on this loan as well. Unless you are already invested in these areas, this is a tough sell.

I once thought that it would take less than thirty years for the earth to return to its natural state. Maybe in Las Vegas if there was an apocalypse and the sand was sweeping the Strip! But those plots of land in Chicago have been vacant for well over fifty years, and they look the same as when the buildings first fell.

Opening of the 75th Street promenade. Courtesy Site Design Group

This last year has seen more interventions that have brought brightness to the neighborhoods. Lamar Johnson Collaborative’s Pop Courts at Chicago Avenue and Lockwood opened last month and are making the Austin neighborhood sizzle. The 75th Street promenade was a collaboration of our company, Site Design Group, with Brook Architecture, Booth Hansen, Vladimir Radutny and Krueck Sexton Partners who occupied parking spaces to help Chatham businesses grow their revenues up to thirty percent. Our collaboration with Studio Gang to create a roller skating rink in West Garfield Park thrills the people of Madison and Pulaski to the beat of the beat. Design Trust, an entity created by Katherine Darnstadt, Paola Aguirre and Elle Ramel, leads three different architectural teams to create sidewalk and street interventions in South Chicago, Humboldt Park and Back of the Yards. The vacant positions in the neighborhoods are gradually filling up. But that’s not enough. There has to be a plan for longevity, wealth creation and reinvestment. This Biennale is the start of this plan.

We now have a different challenge ahead of us. The 2020 pandemic has decimated the office real estate market in downtown Chicago. He’s not coming back anytime soon. People have figured out how to work remotely. They don’t have to share space and germs with their coworkers. So what happens to all of these investments? Does he return to the neighborhoods where everyone can have their living / working space? Can they grow their own food in the wasteland next door? Is neighborhood value increasing as downtown, the Central Business District, reinvents itself? That’s the beauty and the promise of the 2021 Chicago Biennale. It gives us pause: how much is this city available?


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Chinese elected officials approve funding for community ice rink https://speedskating.org/chinese-elected-officials-approve-funding-for-community-ice-rink/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:09:54 +0000 https://speedskating.org/chinese-elected-officials-approve-funding-for-community-ice-rink/ by Mary Grow At their September 13 meeting, Chinese elected officials unanimously approved the recreation committee’s plan to spend approximately $ 5,000 from the recreation reserve account on an ice rink this winter, and congratulated President Martha Wentworth and the rest of the committee for their activity. Wentworth explained the plans and answered many questions […]]]>
by Mary Grow

At their September 13 meeting, Chinese elected officials unanimously approved the recreation committee’s plan to spend approximately $ 5,000 from the recreation reserve account on an ice rink this winter, and congratulated President Martha Wentworth and the rest of the committee for their activity.

Wentworth explained the plans and answered many questions from board members.

The committee proposes the purchase of a removable ice rink, made of hard plastic boards. Wentworth has a half-dozen volunteers to set it up this fall after the soccer and football teams are over and to take it down in the spring before the baseball teams need the field. She plans to store the boards in the soccer storage garage.

The rink will be on the city-owned southern ball field on the grounds of the China Middle School, so the ball field lights will be available for evening skating, likely on Friday or Saturday. Wentworth envisions the rink as being primarily for family use, primarily during the day. A few hours could be set aside for hockey players one day a week, she suggested.

She had spoken with Southern China Fire Chief Richard Morse about providing the estimated 9,600 gallons of water to fill the rink and returning firefighters to flood it when the ice gets too rough. She expects other volunteers, the recreation committee, and local organizations interested in selling hot chocolate and other refreshments to skaters, to keep the area clean.

Winterized trash cans and portable toilets will be on site.

Due to the location, no additional snow removal from the driveway will be necessary for access. Wentworth is looking for volunteers (preferably; the committee will pay if necessary) to clear the ice after snowstorms. She said she was already talking with two people.

When asked about insurance, she said ice skating would not increase the city’s premium unless authorities decide to insure the rink structure itself, for around $ 100 a year.

Wentworth cited the advantages of using a land rink instead of clearing a skating area on Lake China: it is a “more controlled environment”: some people fear the strength of the lake ice; and the land allows organizations to sell refreshments and speakers to play skating music.

Ronald Breton, chairman of the selection committee, added that field skaters would not have to watch out for speeding snowmobiles.

City manager Rebecca Hapgood suggested the rink may be eligible for federal funds under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). Wentworth had heard of another possible source of grant funding.

In other cases, Hapgood announced that the city-owned land on Lakeview Drive has been sold, for $ 83,000, but the closure is postponed until October because the title company has such a backlog of business.

Selectmen postponed until its next meeting the action on tenders for the installation of heat pumps in buildings in the city.

After discussion with codes officer Jaime Hanson, elected officials voted unanimously for the city attorney to begin the process of suing a Winding Hill Road landowner for long-standing uncorrected violations city ​​ordinances and state laws.

The September 13 meeting began with the annual public hearing on the state’s proposed amendments to the annexes to the General Assistance Ordinance, adjusting the amounts of aid in different categories. There was no public comment. Selectmen then adopted the changes unanimously.

Kennebec County Sheriff’s Deputy Ivano Stefanizzi attended the meeting and said he was well received by most residents, both as he patrolled the city’s roads and in last summer when he and his colleagues were patrolling China Lake.

Hapgood recalled that the first half payment of Chinese property taxes 2021-2022 is due at the municipal office before the close of business on Thursday, September 30. Interest on late payments begins immediately.

She read City Clerk Angela Nelson’s report that tax payments are coming in well, with some people paying for the whole year.

Assessor Kelly Grotton’s report added that if people think their property is assessed, and therefore taxed, more than it should be, the deadline to file a claim for abatement is February 17, 2022. Any personal property tax appeal must be accompanied by a complete list of such assets.

Public works foreman Shawn Reed reported, via Hapgood, that his team were preparing roads for paving in the South China village and elsewhere in the southern part of the city. Pike Industries plans to begin paving in China on September 23, if there is no rain delay by then.

Irène Bélanger is retiring

At the September 13 selectmen meeting in China, Irene Belanger, a longtime selectman, announced that she would be retiring this fall and resigning from most of the other boards and committees she sits on, due to her husband’s health. Other council members congratulated her on her long service to the city.

The next regular meeting of Chinese elected officials is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Monday, September 27. Their first meeting in October will be on Tuesday evening October 12, as Monday October 11 is the feast of the indigenous peoples.

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Virginia Mary “Ginny” MacKenzie | Obituary https://speedskating.org/virginia-mary-ginny-mackenzie-obituary/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://speedskating.org/virginia-mary-ginny-mackenzie-obituary/ Williamsport – Virginia Mary MacKenzie (Ginny), 96, died on September 9, 2021 in Williamsport. Ginny was born in Philadelphia on October 2, 1924 to the late Virginia (Jean) Campbell and John Kehoe. Ginny grew up in West Philadelphia and graduated from West Catholic Girls High School, where she was proud to be a member of […]]]>

Williamsport – Virginia Mary MacKenzie (Ginny), 96, died on September 9, 2021 in Williamsport.

Ginny was born in Philadelphia on October 2, 1924 to the late Virginia (Jean) Campbell and John Kehoe. Ginny grew up in West Philadelphia and graduated from West Catholic Girls High School, where she was proud to be a member of the choir. Her beautiful singing voice led her to sing with a local band during and after high school. She met Ronald MacKenzie, the love of her life, while in high school, at the local rink in 1941.

Ginny and Ronnie (Ginny’s nickname for Ron) were married in Philadelphia on January 16, 1943. While Ronnie was stationed in Alaska during World War II, Ginny moved to Seattle to be near him and gave birth to them. first child, Little Ginny, in August 1945.

Ginny and Ron were going to be raising five more children in the Philadelphia area. She was a wonderful, caring and loving mother to each of them. Their homes were always filled with music and Ginny’s songs. Ginny and Ron have had many parties throughout their lives, and they especially enjoyed dancing at the Antlers and other venues. Ginny was known for the style and design of the clothes and accessories and the beautiful homes she created.

In 1976 the family moved to Williamsport where Ginny and Ron made many friends and led very happy and active lives. While Ron worked for JB Gibbons, Ginny continued to raise the family and was active on many volunteer committees with the St. Boniface Roman Catholic Church. Ginny and Ron were both very active at Bridge House and reached master’s level in bridge. They enjoyed attending tournaments all over Pennsylvania.

In January 1993, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with a big party in the ballroom of the Hotel Genetti. Guests have come from as far away as California, Colorado, New York, New Jersey and, of course, Pennsylvania.

Ginny was predeceased by Ron, her husband of 70 years; his mother, Jean France; her father, John Kehoe; her stepfather, Edouard France; his sister, Rita Nimmer; and daughter Virginia MacKenzie Axtell.

Ginny is survived by her five children, Randy MacKenzie and Robert MacKenzie of Williamsport, Mary Mackenzie of Lakewood, Colorado, and Linda MacKenzie Kennerly and Theresa MacKenzie of Golden, Colorado. She is also survived by her beloved grandson, River MacKenzie of Lakewood, Colo., And her brother, Edward France Jr., of the King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. She is also survived by many nieces and nephews.

A Christian burial mass will be celebrated for Ginny at St. Boniface Roman Catholic Church, 326 Washington Blvd., Williamsport, PA 17701 on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at 10 a.m. He is scheduled to visit the church before mass at 9 a.m. Interment will follow at St. Boniface Cemetery, Williamsport.

Ginny will be sadly missed by her family. His energy and love for life will never be duplicated. Thank you, Ginny, for these 96 wonderful years.

Funeral arrangements are in the care of Crouse Funeral Home, 133 E. Third Street, Williamsport, PA 17701.

To plant a tree in memory of Virginia MacKenzie as a living tribute, please visit Tribute Store.

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City Code Changes Approved Despite Divided Council – Chico Enterprise-Record https://speedskating.org/city-code-changes-approved-despite-divided-council-chico-enterprise-record/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 11:08:19 +0000 https://speedskating.org/city-code-changes-approved-despite-divided-council-chico-enterprise-record/ CHICO – After a month-long hiatus, Chico City Council resumed Tuesday evening with a main talking point on the agenda for final reading: amending the city code. The amendments created divisions among the citizens of Chico, significantly in the last council when they were presented at first reading. The amendments were once again given a […]]]>

CHICO – After a month-long hiatus, Chico City Council resumed Tuesday evening with a main talking point on the agenda for final reading: amending the city code.

The amendments created divisions among the citizens of Chico, significantly in the last council when they were presented at first reading. The amendments were once again given a final reading and passage on Tuesday before going 4-3 without the support of Deputy Mayor Kasey Reynolds, Councilor Alex Brown and Councilor Deepika Tandon.

Among the changes: redefining “accommodation space” and “camp”, changing the rules for storing personal property in public space, clearer definitions of how the police interact with homeless people and decisive guidelines on what is considered an open shelter.

At Brown’s request, City Attorney Vincent Ewing spoke about the change in city ordinances.

“As I mentioned on first reading on this point, the city ordinances had been criticized by Judge England, several community services and the ACLU,” Ewing said. “This is what I would describe as a ‘cleaning order’. It is not about running out and starting to enforce these ordinances.

Additional appropriations and budget changes were also discussed by council after being presented by Public Works-Engineering for the transfer of funds from an existing capital project to a new municipal recreation fund.

The changes relate to a potential ice rink in downtown Chico. Public Works-Engineering said in its report that the change will allow fundraising staff to track revenue from sponsorships, rink admissions, rink rentals and special events. The potential opening date is set for November 19 and would run for eight weeks.

After councilors discussed the possibility of the rink being affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the current downtown area not housed and the details of the contract with the rink supplier, the item on the agenda was been delayed. It will be reintroduced at the next council meeting with more information regarding the contract and the impact of the ice rink on the environment. The reintroduced element passed 7-0.

Nichole Nava spoke to council about the potential rink and concerns about the downtown location, citing homeless people at City Plaza.

“I support the things that are good for Chico. Hopefully we’ll get our act together by then, ”Nava said. “What are we going to do to make everyone feel safe? “

Jesica Giannola spoke to council and said the rink looked unpleasant during an ongoing housing crisis.

“We are currently experiencing a housing crisis. Focusing on an ice rink when we have a heavenly ice rink doesn’t seem right. It’s like a slap in the face of (the city’s) needs, ”said Jesica Giannola. “Why do we live in two separate worlds? It is simply not appropriate. It sounds like fun, but it’s just not our reality right now.

A review of the proposed US Rescue Plan Youth Grant program was also approved and the final allocation decided. The program received an allocation of $ 500,000 to be spent on youth.

On the advice of Vice Mayor Reynolds and Councilor Morgan, funds for the program will be split 70-30, with 70 percent of the funds going to repairing fences along the nearby Union Pacific Railroad cycle path, extending from avenue W. Lindo to Chemin de Rio Chico. Due to its proximity to the state of Chico, many students use the bike path to get to and from class. The remaining 30 percent of the funds will go to three or less nonprofit organizations supporting young people. It went 6-1 without the support of Councilor Brown.

The director of human resources and risk management, Jamie Cannon, also made a request to the city for a change in the salary scale of the rangers. Currently, the maximum hourly wage for a sworn ranger is $ 26.13 per hour, with the new recommended maximum wage being $ 37.77. For a senior sworn ranger, the hourly wage is currently $ 30.52, with the new recommended maximum wage being $ 44.19. The motion was carried 6-1 without the support of Councilor Brown.

The council also voted to fill vacancies for the city’s Airport Commission and the Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board.

For the Airports Commission, Marc Breckenridge and Martin Nichols have been selected for a two-year term.

For the Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board, Georgi Bellin and Thom Thomson were selected for a four-year term.

Other business

The board also approved:

  • Zoning changes for a property located at the southwest corner of Esplanade and Eaton Road for an Arco AMPM.
  • A resolution declaring part of the municipal property east of Estes Road and southwest of Ivy Street as exempt surplus.
  • Cancellation of pension obligation bonds to be issued. The adoption advises the municipal authority to cease all further action after the rejection of the judicial validation procedure in July 2021.
  • An update on Mayor Coolidge’s committee appointments following the resignation of two councilors.
    A request from the Deputy Director of Finance for the review and approval of an additional allotment and budget amendment for budget adjustments to revenues, transfers, operating expenses and capital expenses.
  • Additional credit and budget change for the Chico fire department in response to the park fire.
  • Modifications and reallocations of real estate leases at the municipal airport of Chico.
    Approval of the minutes of the meetings of July 20, July 27 and August 3.
  • The formation of a maintenance assessment district for the Amber Lynn subdivision on the south side of Eaton Road between Morseman Avenue and Burnap Avenue.
  • The formation of a maintenance assessment district for the Boeger subdivision at 2932 Morseman Avenue.
  • A joint public security agreement between the city and the state of Chico.
  • Authorization of a pylon sign for Skypark Plaza, adjacent to the property at the northeast corner of Notre-Dame Boulevard and the Skyway.

The next regular meeting will be on Tuesday, September 21 at 6 p.m. in the City Council Chamber at 421 Main Street.


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First Look at Designs for New ReStore in West Bend https://speedskating.org/first-look-at-designs-for-new-restore-in-west-bend/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 09:46:08 +0000 https://speedskating.org/first-look-at-designs-for-new-restore-in-west-bend/ September 6, 2021 – West Bend, WI – Designs for the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore store will be reviewed on Tuesday September 7 by the West Bend Planning Commission. P-21-019, a site plan for building alterations and site changes at 1950 N. Main Street, by Habitat for Humanity. The site plan is for exterior […]]]>

September 6, 2021 – West Bend, WI – Designs for the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore store will be reviewed on Tuesday September 7 by the West Bend Planning Commission.

P-21-019, a site plan for building alterations and site changes at 1950 N. Main Street, by Habitat for Humanity.

The site plan is for exterior renovations to the building and site improvements at a commercial site located at 1950 N. Main Street. Purchased by Habitat for Humanity for the relocation of the Restore sales facility, the site is converting the old ice rink.

Zoning:
• The 2.3 acre site is zoned B-1 Community Business District.
• The developer proposes to construct a 20 ‘x 50’ x 12 ‘chain link fence with an outdoor viewing slatted sales and display area located to the east of the northeast corner of the existing building.

This area will include part of the asphalt parking lot. Staff are concerned about the use of chain link fences and viewing slats used in a commercial screening application.

American commercial real estate

An existing fire hydrant that is not identified on the site plan is located on the north side of the proposed storage area. The hydrant or screen area may need to be relocated to not interfere with fire department requirements.
• All exterior displays and storage are only permitted in projected areas.
• A 12 ‘x 20’ screened garbage area is set up at the southeast corner of the building.

The waste pen will be constructed from an 8 ‘high chain link with viewing slats. Typically, wire mesh waste areas would be constructed from compatible building materials as the main building or painted wood to match the building. Staff would recommend that materials be revised to wood or other compatible material.
Parking Access:
• Access to the site will not be modified.
• The parking lot will be sealed and split. The layout will include a configuration for landing lanes under the existing canopy. A total of 109 standard parking spaces and 5 barrier-free parking spaces will be provided.
Site lighting and landscaping:
• The existing site lighting will be replaced with new LED fixtures on the existing 20 ‘high light poles.

• New foundation plantings are planned along the east side of the building. Staff would recommend that the foundation planting be extended to the north side of the north entrance area.
• Landscaping is planned around the new filtered waste area.
• A planting box is provided between the columns on the covered fall area. The height of the planter is not specified and staff would recommend that the planter be raised to a height of 3′-4 ‘and incorporate the plantings to provide a visual screen of the unloading / loading area.
Architectural elevations of buildings:
• The site plan includes architectural elevations of the building identifying the installation of new windows on all sides of the building.
• An overhead door will replace three existing doors at the south end of the east side of the building. The existing windows at the north end of the east side of the building will be removed and replaced with a sliding front door to relocate the entrance to the main building.
• The existing concrete masonry units and vertical metal siding will be painted “Natural Choice” (Light Beige). It is proposed to paint a strip of blue color (Habitat for Humanity corporate color) along the upper part of the east side of the building. A green color accent is proposed to be painted on the east side of the building through the entrance doors.
Signage:
• No wall sign zone is proposed at this time. Sign deposit and approval will be required
before the installation of any sign.
• The site plan identifies the location of a new floor panel. Exact details have not been submitted at this time and a sign submission and approval must meet current standards before installing the sign.
Recommend approval of the site plan with the following conditions:
1. Revision of the site plan to incorporate minor technical corrections to deal with the fire
concern with standpipes, screened garbage area and landscaping.
2. Approval of a landscape plan and constitution of a bond prior to the delivery of a building
allowed.
3. No storage or outdoor exposure is permitted outside approved protected areas.

Albiero

pc: Russ Wanta, Habitat for Humanity
Adam Hertel, American Architectural Group, Inc.

The Planning Commission meets on Tuesday, September 7 at 6 p.m. in the council chamber of the town hall. The meeting is open to the public.


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“Queens of Pain” to premiere at the NJ at the Indie Street Film Festival https://speedskating.org/queens-of-pain-to-premiere-at-the-nj-at-the-indie-street-film-festival/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 14:00:09 +0000 https://speedskating.org/queens-of-pain-to-premiere-at-the-nj-at-the-indie-street-film-festival/ NEW | CHARACTERISTICS | OVERVIEW | EVENTS originally published: 08/28/2021 (FORT MONMOUTH, NJ) – Queens of pain will premiere in New Jersey at the Indie Street Film Festival on Friday, September 10, 2021 at 8:00 p.m. at Fort Monmouth Drive-in. One of the most successful teams in New York sports history, Gotham Girls Roller Derby […]]]>
NEW | CHARACTERISTICS | OVERVIEW | EVENTS



originally published: 08/28/2021

(FORT MONMOUTH, NJ) – Queens of pain will premiere in New Jersey at the Indie Street Film Festival on Friday, September 10, 2021 at 8:00 p.m. at Fort Monmouth Drive-in. One of the most successful teams in New York sports history, Gotham Girls Roller Derby is a feminist powerhouse of elite, misfit and renegade athletes. The film follows three women – Suzy Hotrod, Evilicious, and Captain Smack Sparrow – as they struggle to balance life in New York City with the work needed to maintain their place on the world’s best roller derby team.

The team’s ties to Jersey are strong: Co-manager Cassie Hay skated for the Garden State Rollergirls in Newark for a while, competing at Asbury Park and spending time in Wildwood. Hay has lived in New Jersey for 8 years, while co-director Amy Winston has family in Holmdel, NJ. One of the main subjects of the film, Suzy Hotrod, is originally a girl from South Jersey.

“We are very happy to bring Queens of pain at the Indie Street Film Festival, ”Wilson said. “The organizers of Indie Street firmly believe in connecting people through the arts, and I don’t think there has ever been a more critical time to build community by sharing stories of resilience and hope, like ours. “

Suzy hotrod, one of the world’s most renowned roller derby stars, is a Catholic schoolgirl turned punk rocker who has graced the pages of Sports Illustrated and ESPN. In her 15th season, Suzy continues to compete at an elite level against women half her age while facing the sacrifices she made to play and the legacy she will leave behind.

bad struggles to get back on skates and pass a skills test after a surprise pregnancy and difficult Caesarean section. Determined, Eva tries to adjust to a grueling training schedule, a hectic career, and raising a newborn baby. She wants to retire on her own terms after her 15th season, but will she be able to survive this one?

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New to Sports, Newly Engaged and Testing New Body After Major Weight Loss Surgery, Rookie Captain Smack Sparrow dive into the world of roller derby to challenge your body, gain confidence and be accepted in the tribe. When she loses her job shortly before her wedding, everything she worked for is on the line.

Director Cassie Hay skated with Gotham Roller Derby from 2006 to 2011. As a writer and documentary filmmaker, Hay has always wanted to tell the story of these athletes in a way that is normally not seen by audiences: from a woman’s point of view – and a former player – from the point of view.

In 2017, with the rise of the #MeToo movement, directors Hay and Winston began discussing more about the myriad of obstacles women face in pursuing their passions – a significant issue for them and at the heart of this story.

After assembling a talented team and raising $ 32,910 through a successful Kickstarter campaign, Queens of pain was filmed during several sleep-deprived weekends in New York City with the crew coming from San Francisco and Austin.

Since filming, Hay and Winston have presented, secured and hosted the “SIDELINED: Women’s Sports in Mass Media” panel at SXSW 2019. Queens of pain premiered at the Austin Film Festival and premiered at the Sheffield International Film Festival, Oxford Film Festival, Brooklyn Film Festival, and Big Bear Film Summit.

The Indie Street Film Festival will also have online screenings from September 13-19. Click here rent the movie.

Co-director, Cassie Hay is a former Gotham Girls skater and documentary filmmaker whose first feature The Liberators premiered at SXSW and has been released worldwide. His cinematic work includes major film productions (The Wolf of Wall Street, For Colored Girls), television (The Leftovers, Bored to Death, Law & Order), commercials, etc. More recently, his work has been exhibited at the Museum of the Moving Image.

Co-director, Amy Winston is a freelance writer and marketing consultant. With a background in creative writing, content production and strategy, she has spent the last decade creating marketing and advertising campaigns for Fortune 500 companies and the world’s biggest brands including Samsung, Procter & Gamble, Starbucks. , Intel and Google.

Roller derby, practiced on an inclined track, was first designed in the 1930s and was popular in the United States until the 1970s. In the early 2000s, modern women’s roller derby made its debut in Austin, Texas. Beginning with the Texas Rollergirls, flat track roller derby leagues began to form as businesses run by the athletes themselves. This iteration of the sport spread like wildfire over the following years, as the ability to play on an ice rink or other venue, rather than building and storing a large track in the bank, made it possible to play the game. game pretty much anywhere.

While the original version of the sport became more of a show with fights and staging, roller derby today is a legitimate sport played by real athletes.

Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) – the international governing body of women’s roller derby on flat track – represents more than 450 member leagues on 6 continents.

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