Skate vs. Skate 3: which game to play?

The revered Skate The series is finally coming to Xbox Game Pass. Skate and Skating 3, released in 2007 and 2010, were originally Xbox 360 titles that can now be played on Xbox One and Xbox Series S | X. Although no game of the Skate franchise is available on PC, it’s a more than welcome inclusion in this series of Game Pass additions.

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However, there are many significant differences between the first title and its third entry. Many fans consider the original Skate to be the ultimate skateboarding experience in video games; However, Skating 3 has a lot to offer that the original game didn’t have. Ultimately, it’s best to try both games and see which one is better for the player, but what are the pros and cons of each?


7 Skate 1 feels best to control

Skateboard 1 Trick Demonstration Skateboard Controls 3

Skate was a revolutionary game when it was released. Other skateboard games including the Tony Hawk’s professional skater series, allowed players to perform tricks with simple button inputs that often challenge real-life physics and human abilities. Skating 3 has a similar problem, in that the controls aren’t as complex but lead to some silly tricks that don’t make physical sense.

The original Skate, however, remains an incredibly satisfying skating experience. The player cannot get off his board and run as in Skating 2 and Skating 3. This forces players to find good trick spots while constantly being on the move. Thumbstick controls have been pretty well honed in the simple in-game environment, which makes things a bit more intuitive and realistic.

6 Skate 3 offers good online playability

Skate-3-PS3

One of the main advantages of Skating 3 on Xbox Game Pass is the inclusion of online gameplay. In Skate it is not possible to play online with others, but Skating 3 opens this feature to a wide range of activities. The Hall of Meat, Trick Competitions, and Co-Op are just a few of the options available to play Skating 3 with friends.

Unfortunately, the games don’t offer local multiplayer on Xbox Game Pass. Although Skate has some fun alternative game modes, Skating 3 always wins the multiplayer award. It offers a wide variety of wacky game modes and multiplayer features not present in the original title.

5 Skate 1 offers more “skater culture”

Skate 1 Culture Skater Skate 3

Or Skating 2 and Skating 3 put the player in the shoes of a relatively established skater, Skate 1 starts the player at the very beginning of their journey to the top. As such, it showcases the aesthetic of the skater much more. Grungy vibes and great subtle trick spots are absolutely all over its relatively small map.

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It’s a bit more realistic in terms of where the skateboarders would actually choose to try out a few tricks. Or Skating 2 and Skating 3 have a lot of weird spots, Skate keeps things grounded. Players won’t find an endless tunnel, but they might find a place with perfectly spaced grindable benches near a staircase.

4 Skate 3 is prettier than the previous two

Skate 3 Indy

As typical of sequels in a game franchise, Skating 3 is much more beautiful than the original title released three years earlier. They both came out for the same console, but Skating 3 is better optimized and fully utilizes the capabilities of the Xbox 360.

Moreover, while Skate has a very grungy and realistic feel throughout the map design and color scheme, Skating 3 is much more dynamic. The colors are really eye-catching in this 11-year-old title, enough to mask some of the graphics capabilities of the time.

3 Skate 1 has a less realistic physics

Skate 1 Physics Skate 3 Comparison

As the graphics improved with the series, the game engine’s ability to handle physics also improved. Skate is an incredibly fun and satisfying experience that is still miles ahead of modern skating games. Where it wobbles a bit, however, are the exact grinds, the exact landing, and the time in the air.

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Even though the game is still more difficult than its contemporary titles, Skate feels a bit floating at times. He does not pay as much attention to the details of physics as Skating 2 or Skating 3, and not being able to get off the board makes pushing unrealistic.

2 The world of Skate 3 is generic

pad 3 and not pad 4

A complaint that fans of the Skate series had with the third entry was how bland his world was. Skate 1 and Skating 2 realistic looking maps with subtle skating spots integrated into the surroundings; yet, Skating 3 is much more comfortable offering players both bland and ridiculous locations. It just doesn’t pay much attention to the design of the world.

Some fans compared Skating 3 To The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, because both titles are the most popular in their respective franchises despite a less detailed world to explore. Skate encourages players to find their own path and create their own fun, while Skating 3 offers cool times and places with little effort on the part of the player.

1 The verdict: Skate 1 vs Skate 3

In the end, the decision to play the first Skate title or Skating 3 is an individual choice. There is no objective fact that dictates which is better than the other. Skate is a satisfying skating experience with a great world and satisfying skating mechanics. On the other hand, Skating 3 is much nicer to look at and has an easier learning curve for those new to its control scheme.

Either way, the Skate the games are quite different from other skating video games of their ilk. The unique control scheme, true skating inspirations, and lightweight RPG mechanics involved in enhancing her character are worth playing. These are two games that any skating enthusiast (or fan of combo-oriented games) should experience on Game Pass.

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(Left) On a boat at The Witness (Right) Standing in a field at There


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