UMD Women’s Hockey: Versatile and adaptable, Rogge leads Bulldogs to NCAA title win – The Rink Live

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — As time ticked away during second overtime in the first Frozen Four semifinal on Friday at Pegula Ice Arena on the Penn State campus, Minnesota Duluth senior forward Naomi Rogge in a redshirt accepted a pass into the slot from fifth-year senior wing Elisabeth Giguère.

Skating barely a full stride and still above the face-off spot, she played the puck just once before firing a shot that went through the legs of a Northeast defender and past the side of the stick. of a Patty Kazmaier Award-winning goaltender.

It was not only the biggest blow of Rogge’s five seasons as a Bulldog, but the biggest blow for the program in over a decade, as he sent UMD into the championship game of the NCAA Sunday at 3 p.m. against Ohio State.

The Bulldogs last played for an NCAA title in 2010 when they beat Cornell 3-2 in triple overtime at Ridder Arena in Minneapolis. Thanks to Rogge, a sixth national championship is just one win away for the Bulldogs.

“She’s been amazing this year,” said UMD fifth-year Anna Klein, Rogge’s longtime classmate. “She was very consistent and that goal was huge. It was a great shot, I loved it.

“You shouldn’t leave Rogge open in this spot,” added UMD senior goalkeeper Emma Soderberg, a teammate of the past four years. “Good things are going to happen for us.”

A special return season

Rogge’s fifth season as a Bulldog was a career year, with 19 goals and 15 assists for 34 points — all college highs — in 39 games.

His previous highs were his first and second seasons. Rogge had 16 goals and eight assists in his rookie season in 2017-18 and 12 goals and 11 assists the following year, before missing the entire 2019-20 season with a knee injury.

When Rogge returned for her redshirt junior season in 2020-21, she was held to four goals and seven assists in 19 games.

Minnesota Duluth forward Naomi Rogge (9) skates with the puck against Northeast defenseman Tory Mariano (44) during the Frozen Four Women’s Semi-Final on Friday, March 18, 2022 at Pegula Ice Arena in University Park, Utah. Pennsylvania.

Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune

“I was trying too hard to be the old me last season rather than the new me, because my body is different,” Rogge said. “I have to be a little more aware of that and aware of how my knee feels and all that.”

Realizing she had to change her game and accepting that she wasn’t as fast as she once was, Rogge said she had started to work more on her shooting. Unable to get into the tight areas she was used to, Rogge worked on her hands, she got better at creating space, and she worked to find passing lanes in tight places.

She also worked on her long game and the kind of shooting she unleashed with 1:45 left in the fifth period Friday to beat Northeastern. Rogge admitted that she might not have taken this kind of picture in first or second year.

Minnesota Duluth Women's Hockey takes on the Northeast in the Frozen Four Semifinals at Pegula Ice Arena
Minnesota Duluth forward Naomi Rogge (9) shoots the puck for the game-winning goal against Northeastern in the Frozen Four Women’s Semi-Final on Friday March 18, 2022 at Pegula Ice Arena in University Park, Pennsylvania.

Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune

“I would probably try to be a little cuter with it at a younger age,” Rogge said. “As I get older, I find that when it comes to the end of these games, getting shots on net is what’s important. I’ve always tried to pull through the D. It’s usually not the first thing that comes to mind, so maybe the new mature self thinks of it first.

Rogge’s career year for the Bulldogs came as it moved up and down the chart not just week-to-week or game-to-game, but game-to-game. period to period and sometimes quarter to quarter late in games.

And it’s not only her teammates who are constantly changing, but also her position.

Rogge is a natural center, and it’s the position she says she’s most comfortable with because she can see the ice better. She relishes the extra responsibilities she has in the defensive zone.

On the wing, she often finds herself battling some of the toughest and most physical defenders in the WCHA along the boards.

Minnesota Duluth Women's Hockey takes on the Northeast in the Frozen Four Semifinals at Pegula Ice Arena
Minnesota Duluth forward Naomi Rogge (9) celebrates with Minnesota Duluth forward Taylor Anderson (5) after scoring a third period goal during the Frozen Four Women’s Semi-Final on Friday, March 18, 2022 at Pegula Ice Arena in University Park, Pennsylvania.

Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune

“I hate walls like a wing. They suck. They are horrible,” Rogge said. “I would never want to do that, especially with the (defenders) who are in the WCHA and how much pressure they put on you. I definitely don’t like this aspect of the wing.

It’s something she said she was willing to do, however, because it helps the team.

“You always want to help the team the best you can, whatever your role is,” Rogge said. “If I play on the wing, I will accept that and do my best in that position.

“Just being able to do whatever role I’m given. I’ll try to do that for our team.

While Sunday’s national championship will be the last college contest for fifth-year Bulldogs like Klein and Giguere, Rogge isn’t going anywhere.

Thanks to that medical redshirt in 2019-20 and the NCAA granting those who played in 2020-21 an extra season of eligibility, Rogge will be back with the Bulldogs for an unprecedented sixth season in 2022-23, when UMD is set to host the 2023 NCAA Frozen Four at Amsoil Arena in Duluth.

That’s good news not only for UMD on the ice — as they’re set to lose a significant amount of attack from Klein and Giguère — but also off the ice.

Bulldogs senior defenseman Maggie Flaherty, who will be back in 2022-23 for a fifth year, called Rogge one of the most generous people she knows. Rogge leads with her heart on and off the ice, and is as loyal to a friend and teammate as one can get.

“Off the ice, she’s a total leader. She may not have the letter or anything, but she doesn’t need it because she’s a born leader,” Flaherty said. “No matter what you need on or off the ice, she’s always there for you. And I live with her, so I can tell you firsthand.

Minnesota Duluth women's hockey team prepares for national championship game against Ohio State
Minnesota Duluth forward Naomi Rogge (9) looks over the ice during a practice at the Women’s Frozen Four on Saturday, March 19, 2022, at Pegula Ice Arena in University Park, Pennsylvania.

Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune

Rogge said she is returning for a sixth season in college for several reasons, one of which is to ensure fifth-year senior defenseman Ashton Bell has a 2017-18 classmate on the roster after his back from a sabbatical year of Olympic gold. with Canada.

Rogge also wants to play in another Frozen Four and pursue what could be a second national championship.

His main reason to return, however, is to have one last chance to create the kind of unforgettable college memories – such as hangouts, bonfires, trips to the beach and spikeball – that are nearly impossible to achieve. realize once you move on.

“All of that is not achievable once you are no longer in the team,” Rogge said. “It’s so much harder to keep in touch when you all have different schedules, live in different states or countries, even. I think that’s something I never want to throw away so quickly. If I going to have another year especially in one of the best places i have ever lived in my life, i will definitely be back.

Minnesota Duluth Women's Hockey takes on the Northeast in the Frozen Four Semifinals at Pegula Ice Arena
Dale “Hoagie” Haagenson celebrates with Naomi Rogge, Kailee Skinner and Taylor Anderson after a double overtime win over Northeastern in the Women’s Frozen Four Semifinals on Friday March 18, 2022 at Pegula Ice Arena in University Park, Pennsylvania.

Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune

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